Park owners and park home owners’ responsibilities

The park owner’s responsibilities to their residents are largely covered by the agreement that occupiers sign when they move to the park.

The 2013 Mobile Homes Act legislation sets out a new format for pitch fee reviews and specifies what can be included in that review. Site owners have to use a special form to set out their proposals and to obtain the agreement of residents. Once the fee is agreed, residents must pay a pitch fee to the site owner which is, in effect, rent for the land on which the resident’s home stands. The pitch fee can only be changed once a year. And park owners must give residents 28 days’ notice in writing and use a special form – The Pitch Fee Review Form. If a resident and the park owner cannot agree on a new fee, the site owner can apply to a tribunal.

Leedons Park

Beautiful open-plan gardens at Leedons Park, Broadway, Worcestershire

Residents have the right to sell their homes on the open market, or give them to family members. The site owner does not have the right to approve the buyer (or family member) but the incoming resident will have to conform to any site rules (e.g. age – many parks are for retired residents only; or pet owners – some parks ban dogs and/or all pets).

Norton around Lake

Fortunate residents at Norton Manor Park near Presteigne in Powys enjoy fabulous views across the lake

Under the previous legislation, it was already illegal for park owners to evict residents without a court order, harass them into giving up their homes or prevent them from exercising their rights. Now, though, it is illegal for the park owner to give false or misleading information that would interfere with the sale of a resident’s home or interfere with the sale. No longer does the park owner have the right to insist on approving the buyer or  demand contact information about the buyer.

Park home

Castleton Park at St Athans in the Vale of Glamorgan is a developing park which already has some beautiful gardens

The park owner is responsible for keeping common areas of the park in good condition and repairing, if necessary, the bases on which residents’ homes are sited. They are also responsible for maintaining the services supplied by the park to individual plots (e.g. sewerage).

Wizard park homes

This unusual park home is at The Wizard Park, Alderley Edge

If a park owner needs to enter a resident’s home or plot to carry out essential repairs, deliver mail and read gas, electricity and water meters, they can do this without any notice between 9am and 6pm. They may also enter at any other time to carry out emergency or essential works, giving as much notice as possible. For any other reason, the site owner must give 14 days’ written notice.

Should the park owner consider making improvements to the park, he/she must give at least 28 days’ notice in writing to residents, let them know how they can make comments and observations and tell them if the improvements will mean a change to the pitch fee.

Yew Tree park

This block pavior roadway is at Yew Tree Park, Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire

The written agreement also covers the rights and obligations that the park home resident enjoys. These include such things as the resident’s right to keep the park home on its plot, the pitch fee, other charges and services, and the park rules.

Residents are obliged to keep their homes in good repair and make sure that they are clean and tidy, including any fences or outbuildings.

If you are buying a park home don’t forget to take out specialist insurance cover to protect your home and belongings. Find out more about this on the Leisuredays park home insurance page.

14 comments on “Park owners and park home owners’ responsibilities

  1. My static caravan plot has a sewer next to it water is seeping from it and it smells. I have reported this several times and nothing has been done. I am worried that if I report this to the environment services the owners will throw us off

    1. All underground services are the responsibility of your park owner.
      When you make your complaint do it in writing and keep a copy for your own personal records.
      Your local authority should have issued a Site Licence that gives the owner permission to operate a Mobile Home Park and you are entitled to a copy of this. The licence should also be publicly displayed for all residents to have site of.
      Go on line and find information on the Mobile Homes Act.

  2. My car was stolen from outside our mobile home at 9.15pm on the evening of 4th August 2019. I watched them drive off in it and had full description of the culprits.My husband telephoned the police, I telephoned security to tell them not to open the gates but no one answered. I did this 28 times in the next hour still no answer. I went down to the security team who were all chatting outside the amusement arcade and asked to see the CCTV footage. After a while I was told there was none as the cameras had not been working for a very long time. Do I have any recompense with the Park?

    1. Sorry to hear about your stolen car Linda and the stress this must have caused. We suggest you seek legal advice on this matter and write to the park group or owner outlining your concerns and details of the incident.
      We were unable to locate you as a Leisuredays’ customer on our system, however, if your static caravan insurance policy came with legal cover, you may be able to call the provider of the legal service for advice on the matter.

  3. Hi, I bought a parkhome back in 2004, the p/Home was 30 years old that year! I did not have it surveyed as I wanted it so much. However, after living there for for a few months I noticed a small crack from one end to the other on the base. A couple of years passed and I had the chassi work done as it was expired! ‘No problem there’ it was then I was informed about the crack underneath (on the ground) he informed me to check it out with the site manager. This I did, but he told me it was unfortunate for me as I bought it the year it should of been viewed !’by him I’m assuming’ within the years we have been here, he has arranged on a few occasions to hoist the unit up as it keep subsiding! I’ve now taken a picture inside now as I’ve just had a new floor put down in the hallway and noticed I have a at least one inch gap between the floors, I know if I report this to my site manager he will probably say (again) don’t worry, ‘it’s not going anywhere’. I don’t know how I stand on this but, it is a bit of a worry. By the way, I have put 30 extra supports underneath as the manager told me (years ago) that the furniture etc is heavy for a parkhome. Looking forward to your reply and advice.

    1. We’d suggest writing to your park owner Suzanne and asking for a structural survey to be carried out and to seek further advice from the Citizen’s Advice Bureau. You may also need to inform your insurance company about the extra supports as these could invalidate your policy.

  4. Our park home is not on a concrete base, lately with the amount of rain we sometimes get we have noticed that a lot of water is collecting in one corner of our park home making the ground muddy. This is worrying us, we don’t want subsidence. We have spoken to site management and they say they are not willing to do anything about it. Help we need advise

    1. You need to check your park agreement but usually, the park grounds are the site owner’s responsibility. We would suggest taking some advice and writing to your park owner outlining your concerns.

  5. Hi. We (several lodge owners)are having constant problems with the site owner. The latest is the septic tank breaking down, owner has blamed nappies and that we (owners of lodges)are liable to pay towards repairs of the tank. He has also requested to see our insurance to cover repairs. Surely, the site owner is responsible for all ground work? Also, under data protection surely he is not entitled to see our personal details of insurance. He has also threatened us of eviction because of noise, yet, theres been no proof, and his own lodge has had noisy guest. Your help is much appreciated.

    1. It’s difficult to know where responsibility for the repairs lies, You would need to check your park agreement. Park operators often need to check that each owner has public liability cover and adequate insurance for replacement of holiday units. Regarding the noise situation, it’s best to talk this through with your park operator and if a solution cannot be reached then seek help from Citizens Advice. If you have legal expenses policy there may be a legal helpline to assist with your query.

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